Vintage Japanese Boxwood Koi Carving

Vintage Japanese Boxwood Koi Carving | Signed

Realized Value: $85.00 Regular price $145.00

Age:1950s (Showa Period)

Descriptive qualities& condition:

Dimensions: 2-1/2”h x 2-0”w x 6-1/4”l                                                               

Pictured is a fine old Japanese hand-carved wooden Koi fish with bead eyes, beautiful carving with realistic scales and caudal, dorsal and pectoral fins. It has a wonderful hand and distinct tactile qualities that are perceptible to the sense of touch. This Koi is carved from one piece of Boxwood which is the oldest wood used for carvings in Asia and used because of its textural qualities. It ihas a natural reddish-brown and patinated finish enhanced through aging. There is an unidentified signature on the bottom.

Vintage Condition: Excellent and all intact is “As is” and retains the original craft/workmanship. Any discoloration, chipping/cracking, surface wear or structural damage noted. 

NOTE: The qualities and characteristics of koi fish have made it a popular Buddhist symbol. It is believed that humans must navigate the treacherous waters of suffering just as koi persistently fight their way against difficult currents. It is the mission of the Bodhisattva to remain focused on the goal of Enlightenment despite turbulent waters all around. The touchstone of Buddha Nature is always there, and koi inspire humans in their ability to stay focused and succeed with grace and style.

Koi fish embody a quiet beauty and mystery that’s both peaceful and intriguing. The name Koi is Japanese and are a legendary fish that have origins in Eastern Asia, Persia and China. Koi fish symbolism has gained strength over the centuries to encompass numerous positive qualities related to courage, overcoming adversity, the ability to attain the highest goals, and strong character. Often associated with Japan, koi, (carp), actually originated from Central Asia in China, and introduced to Japan by Chinese invaders. Koi have been called “living jewels” and “swimming flowers” for their physical beauty with symbolic significance, especially in Asian cultures.